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Saturday Again!

No blog posts for far too long. Means I have been busy, so it is not a bad thing.
This week was mainly taken up by our Faculty of Arts and Design Conference.
Conferences are always time consuming and also something of a mixed bag. this one had its ups and downs, but considering it was the first one of its kind, it was pretty good.
Meeting Donal Fitspatrick the keynote speaker from Curtin U. in Australia was inspiring and he also gave us lots of valuable feed-back.
Sharing ideas with colleagues, listening to their research ideas and presenting my own was all really good. So lets hope this is not the last, but the first of many .

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Presentation for IEB Regional Conference VISUAL ARTS 28 January 2017

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